IHOP Failed Dine-and-Dash Turns into Car Accident

A waitress was struck by a failed “dine-and-dash” driver who left an IHOP in Glendale, Arizona on Tuesday in a hurry. Authorities have since found the female driver responsible.

The driver, 24-year-old Nicole Angelina Raia enjoyed a meal at the International House of Pancakes with another person for lunch. When they had their fill, they allegedly decided to leave the restaurant without paying their bill.

Noticing the 26 dollar lunch bill had not been paid, a waitress ran outside to notify the patrons who left the building. The waitress then tapped on the window of the vehicle Raia was driving to have a word with her about the unpaid account. When her attempt was unsuccessful, according to various news outlets the waitress walked behind the vehicle to take down the license plate number.

Without a warning, Riai backed up the car crashed into the waitress then drove off.

Authorities found Raia and arrested her. After searching her purse and vehicle, they found heroin, which added to the charges. She is allegedly being held on suspicion of aggravated assault with a weapon, theft and possession of drugs.

Car accident statistics state that In the United States approximately 85,000 pedestrians are injured each year and approximately 5,000 people are killed. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration over the last decade there have been more than 63,000 deaths. A large portion of these statistic numbers can be reduced if drivers are more careful when operating a vehicle. Now the waitress will probably join the statistics for the year 2013.

Per the NHTSA, the stats boil down to show that about every seven minutes a pedestrian is either injured or killed by a motor vehicle. They define a pedestrian as any person on foot, walking, running, jogging, hiking, sitting or lying down. In relation to the story, the waitress was a pedestrian standing behind a vehicle. Stats show that people more at risk tend to be children and seniors. Another study found that a significant percentage of accidents were single-car crashes – a vehicle on pedestrian accident.

Visibility is a contributing factor to pedestrian-auto accidents. If it’s too dark, it can be difficult to see a person crossing the road. Wearing reflective clothing can help alleviate this situation or bright colored clothing, even in a well-lit area. Awareness is the most important, however. Don’t assume that a vehicle will stop for you; the operator is probably unable to see you. Make sure you have eye contact prior to crossing the street.

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